consumer / Drone Racing Design for Disruptive Entertainment

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9 FebruaryFeb 2017
 

Competitive Drones

At Design Partners, we constantly work at the forefront of disruptive design. We study trends, technology and human behaviour in order to predict the future and then we work with our ambitious clients to make it a reality. Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Commercial Drones are exciting frontiers where we continue to expand our expertise and foresight. Although drone technology has been around for a long time, recreational and non-military usage has only recently gained widespread adoption.

Design for Disruptive Entertainment
Design for Disruptive Entertainment
Design for Disruptive Entertainment
Design for Disruptive Entertainment
Design for Disruptive Entertainment
 

Drones for Mass-Entertainment

From sending supplies, to flying surveillance cameras, to robotic companions, drones are quickly becoming part of mainstream public services. Many businesses are looking at how the disruptive technology could enhance their systems and services but infrastructures are still in their infancy to support deep adoption. Public perception and acceptance could still be issue as the industry expands, however one such niche where this is not a hindrance is in the entertainment market.

 

Competitive Drone Racing

Drones are widespread in film production but drones are now beginning to breed yet another level of disruption, this time in competitive racing. Starting as an amateur sport in Australia in 2014, professional drone racing companies such as Drone Racing League (DRL) and Aerial Sports League (ASL) are quickly trying to elevate their profile to be the next Formula 1. FAI, the world governing body for airsports, has already introduced a sporting code, and sanctions the First Person Viewer (FPV) Racing events.

Design for Disruptive Entertainment
Design for Disruptive Entertainment
Design for Disruptive Entertainment
 

Designed to Win

FPV drone racing involves pilots who wear virtual-reality style video headsets connected to front-facing cameras on the drones. The body of these aerial vehicles require chassis and plates that are designed to be robust, modular and quickly replaced at pit-stop speeds. They require iconic lighting to make the short crafts recognisable to spectators while they fly at breakneck speeds through stadiums and custom built tracks, and they also need ergonomic, performance-driven controls to fly competitively. Drone races are won based on completion times, checkpoints or in some cases last drone standing. With drone racing videos hitting multiple millions of views online the new sport is set to soar.

 
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9 February Feb 2017